More And More Parents Are Calling For “Old School” Discipline In Classrooms

The discussion on disciplinary measures in Australian classrooms has become more intense, with parents, educators, and scholars all weighing in on the effectiveness of implementing ‘old-school’ methods to address disruptive behavior among students.

The debate was sparked by a senate inquiry into classroom behaviors, which recommended a return to traditional disciplinary approaches as an effective solution. These guidelines, now implemented nationwide, advocate for teaching students fundamental behaviors such as entering classrooms, sitting properly, and asking questions respectfully. It is suggested that desks should be arranged in rows facing the teacher to promote a structured learning environment.

In addition, students are encouraged to practice ‘super walking,’ a method aimed at promoting orderly movement throughout the school premises. These measures are designed to instill discipline and foster a conducive learning atmosphere.

The need for such disciplinary measures arises from research conducted by the Australian Education Research Organisation (AERO), which found that teachers spend around 20% of their time addressing disruptive behavior in classrooms. Dr. Jenny Donavan, CEO of AERO, emphasized the importance of explicitly teaching students appropriate behavior, highlighting the strong correlation between classroom conduct and academic success.

Former teacher-turned-CEO, Dr. Donavan, stressed the significance of consistency in teaching and practicing these behaviors throughout a student’s educational journey. She emphasized that these skills are vital components of effective classroom management.

Parents have also voiced their opinions on the matter, with some attributing the problem to inadequate discipline at home. Others support the reintroduction of strict disciplinary measures in schools, viewing it as a necessary step in addressing the issue of disrespect and unruliness among students.

Former principal Adam Voigt weighed in on the debate, acknowledging the complexity of the issue. He emphasized the need for consistency across schools and cautioned against relying solely on punitive measures, advocating for a balanced approach that incorporates modern teaching methods alongside traditional discipline.

While the debate continues, it is clear that there is no one-size-fits-all solution to addressing disruptive behavior in classrooms. The key lies in finding a balance between modern teaching techniques and traditional disciplinary measures, all while fostering a supportive learning environment that encourages respect and responsibility among students. As educators, parents, and policymakers navigate this challenging terrain, collaboration and open dialogue will be crucial in shaping the future of education in Australia.

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